Possessing History and American Innocence: James Baldwin, William F. Buckley, Jr., and the 1965 Cambridge Debate

Daniel Robert McClure

Abstract


The 1965 debate at Cambridge University between James Baldwin and William F. Buckley, Jr., posed the question: “Has the American Dream been achieved at the Expense of the American Negro?” Within the contours of the debate, Baldwin and Buckley wrestled with the ghosts of settler colonialism and slavery in a nation founded on freedom and equality. Framing the debate within the longue durée, this essay examines the deep cultural currents related to the American racial paradox at the height of the Civil Rights movement. Underscoring the changing language of white resistance against black civil rights, the essay argues that the Baldwin and Buckley debate anticipated the ways the U.S. would address racial inequality in the aftermath of the civil rights era and the dawn of neoliberalism in the 1970s.


Keywords


James Baldwin, William F. Buckley, Jr., culture war, neoliberalism, anti-blackness, white backlash, modernity, slavery, race relations, Civil Rights movement

Full Text:

PDF


DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7227/JBR.2.4

Copyright (c) 2016 Daniel Robert McClure

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Manchester Open Library:
a partnership between The University of
Manchester Library and Manchester University Press

JBR is a collaborative venture made possible by support from Northwestern University and The University of Manchester